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Lomira, Wisconsin

The early history of the Village of Lomira is closely interwoven with the Town of Lomira. Prior to the arrival of white settlers, the son of Chief Black Hawk supposedly camped in the vicinity while blazing a trail from Milwaukee to Green Bay.There is no record of a settlement at Lomira prior to 1849. It was originally called Springfield, but in 1849, the name was changed to Lomira. Local lore says the village is a namesake of Elmira Schoonover, daughter of Sam Schoonover, an early settler. The first Post Office was established on May 11, 1849.

A petition for incorporation of the village of Lomira was made to the circuit court of Dodge County on March 24, 1899. The petition described the designated territory of "433 residents" as "containing a large number of stores, saloons, residences, elevators, hotels, blacksmith shops, cheese factory, planing mill and other places of business, and that the same is a railroad station." Copies of the petition were posted in the saloons of F. Kauper and Peter Greiten, and in the store and office of Peter Wolf, "all of which said places are public places." Petitioners presented the incorporation order at a special term of the circuit court held in the city of Waukesha, Wisconsin on May 9, 1899. Records of the public election on June 3, 1899 show 104 ballots were cast, of which 58 were for incorporation and 45 against.

Today, Lomira is home to 2,430 residents (2010 census). 

Something you might not know...The village is located within the Town of Lomira, at the crossroads of State Highways 49, 67 and 175, and Interstate 41. This makes access to and from Lomira easy!

More stuff of interest...Lomira has a long history of limestone quarries. 

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